Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: ADHD & ADD
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy ADHD
ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) is a diagnosis applied to children and adults who consistently display certain characteristic behaviors over a period of time. Symptoms of the disorder will be seen before the age of 7 even though diagnosis may occur when the child is much older. The level of energy displayed by toddlers can very greatly. Characteristics or behaviors that might lead to a diagnosis of this form of learning disability in a child of 6 are normal behaviors of a toddler at 3. In early childhood there is often a period where there is a burst of activity where kids have what seems like boundless energy and this is to be expected. In order for a diagnosis of ADHD to be made in a school age child, the behaviors have to have been consistent for at least 6 months.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy


The following are symptoms of ADHD as given in the DSM-IV or American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 2000.

DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
I. Either A or B:

A. Six or more of the following symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months to a point that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

Inattention
1. Often does not give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities.
2. Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities.
3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
4. Often does not follow instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions).
5. Often has trouble organizing activities.
6. Often avoids, dislikes, or doesn't want to do things that take a lot of mental effort for long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
7. Often loses things needed for tasks and activities (e.g. toys, school, assignments, pencils, books, or tools).
8. Is often easily distracted.
9. Is often forgetful in daily activities

B.Six or more of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for developmental level:

Hyperactivity
1. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat.
2. Often gets up from seat when remaining in seat is expected.
3. Often runs about or climbs when and where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may feel very restless).
4. Often has trouble playing or enjoying leisure activities quietly.
5. Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor".
6. Often talks excessively.

Impulsivity
1. Often blurts out answers before questions have been finished.
2. Often has trouble waiting one's turn.
3. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).

II. Some symptoms that cause impairment were present before age 7 years.

III. Some impairment from the symptoms is present in two or more settings (e.g. at school/work and at home).

IV. There must be clear evidence of significant impairment in social, school, or work functioning.

V. The symptoms do not happen only during the course of a Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Schizophrenia, or other Psychotic Disorder. The symptoms are not better accounted for by another mental disorder (e.g. Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, or a Personality Disorder).

Based on these criteria, three types of ADHD are identified:
1. ADHD, Combined Type: if both criteria 1A and 1B are met for the past 6 months
2. ADHD, Predominantly Inattentive Type: if criterion 1A is met but criterion 1B is not met for the past six months
3. ADHD, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: if Criterion 1B is met but Criterion 1A is not met for the past six months.


Between 4% to 12% of school-age children have the condition, but it is more common in children with cerebral palsy. As mentioned earlier, because all children show some of these behaviors at times, there are very specific guidelines for determining when they indicate ADHD. The behaviors must appear early in life, before the age of 7, and continue for at least 6 months. In children, they must be more frequent or severe than in others the same age. Above all, the behaviors must create a real handicap in at least two areas of a person's life, such as school, home, work, or social settings. So someone whose work or friendships are not impaired by these behaviors would not be diagnosed with ADHD. Nor would a child who seems overly active at school but functions well elsewhere.

Typically, children with ADHD have an average intelligence but they will require more specific instructional strategies, program modifications or accommodations in order to achieve their potential. Obviously, finding the right combination of strategies for a child with CP can be even more challenging. Many times the individual, their parents and their treatment team are working at making the most of the child's potential and independence: physically, mentally and emotionally.

One of the difficulties in diagnosing ADHD is that it is often accompanied by other problems. For example, many children with ADHD also have a specific learning disability (LD), which means they have trouble mastering language or certain academic skills, typically reading and mathematics. ADHD is not technically a learning disability, but because it can affect with concentration and attention, ADHD can make it extra difficult for a child with learning disability to do well in school.

Most people never outgrow ADHD though many learn to adapt to the condition. Because emotional disorders and attention disorders so often go hand in hand, every child who has ADHD should be checked for accompanying depression.

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Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Hearing, Depression, Breathing Problems,
Drooling, ADHD, ADD, Bowel issues, Swallowing, Epilepsy, Speech Problems.