Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Breathing Difficulties
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy Breathing Problems
Children with cerebral palsy do not frequently have problems with their lungs as a direct result of their impairment. However, depending upon the form of Cerebral Palsy they have, they do conditions which contribute significantly to respiratory problems. Difficulties in swallowing, a weak cough, reflux and seizure can all contribute to the accidental inhalation of oral secretions, food, drink, and stomach contents into the lungs.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy


When an child with Cerebral Palsy ends up with foreign matter in their lungs, they do not always have the ability to cough hard enough to dispel the material or in the midst of a seizure or for a child with a spastic form of CP, the muscles may not be working in a coordinated fashion.

Some possible respiratory complications are: blocked or obstructed airways, inflamation of the airways, diminished bility to clear secretions, weakened lungs, and lung damage. Many of these potential complications greatly increase the risk for pneumonia in individuals with Cerebral Palsy.

Pneumonia is a general term that refers to an infection of the lungs. For individulas who do not have the physical impairments caused by CP, pneumonia often begins after an upper respiratory tract infection. Children with Cerebral Palsy are more likely to inhale a foreign body (such as food or drink), introducing bacteria into the lungs.

Symptoms of pneumonia vary, depending on the age of the child and the cause of the pneumonia, but some common symptons are: fever, chills, cough, unusually rapid breathing, breathing with grunting or wheezing sounds, labored breathing that makes a child's rib muscles retract (when muscles under the rib cage or between ribs draw inward with each breath), vomiting, chest pain, abdominal pain, decreased activity, loss of appetite (in older children) or poor feeding (in infants), or in extreme cases, bluish or gray color of the lips and fingernails
 
Sometimes a child's only symptom is rapid breathing. When the pneumonia is in the lower part of the lungs near the abdomen, there may be no breathing problems at all, but there may be fever and abdominal pain or vomiting.

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Associated Conditions of Cerebral Palsy: Hearing, Depression, Breathing Problems,
Drooling, ADHD, ADD, Bowel issues, Swallowing, Epilepsy, Speech Problems.