Cerebral Palsy and Evaluations.
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy and EvaluationsCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral Palsy

As mentioned in the section on Legal Rights, your child has a right to an effectual and fruitful education. This right is chiefly supported by the state requirements enacted by the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA). IDEA only protects the right to an education for children with disabilities, and therefore your child must be evaluated and deemed “disabled” before being eligible for special education benefits. Regulations demand that states develop an effective method of evaluation intended to identify and assess the needs and strengths of each child before that child is placed in special education. These procedures must also include your input on behalf of you and your child.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy

Most school districts recognize that children with cerebral palsy require special services, and so in most cases, a simple diagnosis should be adequate in obtaining the recognition of your child’s special needs. Recognition, however, is not the challenge. The challenging part will be obtaining the actual services that your child needs in a timely manner. Do not get discouraged – if at first you don’t get the results you’re looking for, try enlisting the help of physicians or other professionals whose word may greatly influence the decision-making process.

If you do not find your child’s evaluation to be satisfactory, you will undoubtedly find the individualized education plan (IEP) that is formulated from the evaluation unsatisfactory, as well. If this is the case, you may consider getting an impartial evaluation of your child. In situations in which the parents and school disagree on the child’s evaluation, the school may agree that the second evaluation is necessary. If this is the case, the second evaluation may be arranged through the school, in which case the cost of it would be covered by the school district. If the school does not agree with your decision to seek a second opinion, then you will need to shoulder the cost of it by yourself. Either way, the school must supply you with a list of capable professionals who are able to carry out the independent evaluation. If you choose to find your own source for the second evaluation, hospitals and Parent groups are wonderful resources for such information.

The professionals who assess your child’s development must explain their findings, the types of tests used for the assessment, and the scores your child accomplished. You should absolutely share your beliefs and remarks about your child with these professionals – they are required to take such information into account. After the specialist has completed the assessment, an IEP meeting will be scheduled, at which time these professionals will report their findings. On the basis of this report, the IEP is formulated. This plan will layout exactly what objectives are in store for your child for that coming year. Every subsequent year, the IEP must be revisited in a meeting to discuss your child’s academic progress and to outline the upcoming year’s objectives.

 

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Cerebral Palsy and Education: Evaluations, Financing,
IFSP, IEP, IHP, Legal Rights and Special Education.