Cerebral Palsy and Financing.
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy and Financing IssuesCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral PalsyCerebral Palsy

Having a disability can create much strain on a family’s economic situation. Medical expenses for a person with cerebral palsy will likely include hospitalizations, case management services, and ambulance transportation costs, as well as therapy and various other expenses. These costs will amount to quite the bottom line after consecutive years of necessary care, and can become one of the largest burdens a family may encounter in their experiences with cerebral palsy. Know, however, that there are ways to finance your child’s care successfully, and with any luck with as little cost to you as possible.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy

There are many different resources for funding, the most prevalent of which are the family’s own income, federal or state programs, private health insurance, and private charitable sources. While only an estimation, it is said that about one fifth of all of your child’s healthcare costs will be at direct cost to your family. Financing the care of an adult with cerebral palsy differs from financing the care of a cerebral palsied child in that it’s usually based on the adult’s status. If he or she is able to work in adulthood, it is likely that health insurance will supplement his or her medical expenses. If he or she is without private health insurance or other resources and is dependent, it is possible Medicaid would cover the cost of healthcare.

Medicaid is an eligibility-based program of federal grants given to states to pay for specific health services. Each state determines its own eligibility criteria, and eligibility is always decided by financial need. In other words, a family can only make so much every year, and if their income is above the state-set cap, they are not eligible for Medicaid. Depending on the state, when a child of a family reaches the age of 18 or 21 his or her eligibility is based on individual income. Inpatient hospital care, outpatient services such as a physician, etc, lab tests, and nursing services are examples of what is covered by Medicaid. Coverage of other services, such as dentistry, medications, eyeglasses, and home healthcare, varies from state to state. Medicaid guidelines are subject to change, due to fiscal constraints and how resources are allocated, and as with most governmental programs, congress continues to amend laws with respect to eligibility, reimbursement, and benefits. Because of this, you should make sure to look into Medicaid coverage in your state to be sure of that it’s up to date.

Medicaid has a program, called the Medicaid Home and Community Based Waiver, aimed at those who are highly dependent on technology that attempts to decrease the price of hospitalization and diminish excessive hospital stays. The program pays for needed care that is provided in the home or in a certified community-based center, as oppose to nursing care provided in a hospital.

In addition to Medicaid, there are government-run programs called Programs for Children with Special Health Care Needs included under the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant. These programs offer services such as case management, nursing, social work, physical therapy, as well as other needed therapies to children with a chronic condition such as cerebral palsy. As of now, there is no income requirement to be eligible for the Programs for Children with Special Health Care Needs, but as in the case of Medicaid, eligibility is determined by the state. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is another governmental program intended to, as its name suggests, supplement the income of blind, aged, and disabled adults, as well as disabled children. A child is only eligible for SSI services if he or she belongs to a low-income household and meets the SSI “criteria of disability.” If a child is deemed eligible for SSI services, said services are provided through Medicaid.

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