Causes of Cerebral Palsy: Origins, Etiology, Aetiology, Causal Pathways
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
Cerebral Palsy
“Crawford studied 500 pregnancies and found that the mothers producing low birth weight babies were deficient in 43 of 44 different vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids when compared to mothers producing normal birth weight babies.”
Cerebral Palsy
There are several profoundly preventable interventions that will result in a decreased rate of cerebral palsy. One is rubella vaccination. Another is noting Rh compatibility, both noted in other sections of this website. Yet, despite prolonged campaigns by WHO and UNICEF, the lack on iodine in the salt or soil of a society can manifest itself in high rates of endemic cretinism and mostly spastic diplegia forms of cerebral palsy. This is, perhaps the most preventable source of cerebral palsy, mostly appearing in the developing world.

“Iodine deficiency can result in many pathological outcomes with severe adverse affects on the fetus, neonate, child and adolescent as well as the adult….With deficiency in early pregnancy there is a spectrum of disorders from death through clinical endemic cretinism (spastic diplegia and deaf mutism) to more subtle deficits of motor and cognitive performance….The population at risk of iodine deficiency due to low iodine levels in soil is increasing. In 1993 the World Health Organization estimated that 1.6 billion people were at risk of iodine deficiency (Hertzel at al. 1997), up from 1 billion in 1990. Of these, 2 per cent (or 320 million) may have preventable brain damage and an estimated 5.7 million have overt cretinism (Herzel 1994a, Herzel and Pandav 1996), making it the most common cause of preventable brain damage in the world.” (Stanley, Blair & Alberman: p. 57)

If iodine is administered before conception, common forms of cerebral palsy can be prevented. In New Guinea in the 1950s the indigenous population switched to iodine free salt. An epidemic resulted that subsided only when iodine rich salt was reintroduced.

Many fats or fatty acids are necessary or essential to a healthy embryo including arachidonic acic, arachidonyl phosphoglycerol, docosahexaenyl glyceride, and endothelial ethanolamine phosphoglycerides which can be vital to membrane integrity. Their absence have all have been suggested as risk factors contributing to low birth weight, premature birth, slow fetal growth and cerebral palsy. Linoleic and linolenic acid are vital to brain tissue growth and blood supply infrastructure.

A mother’s nutritional constellation at the time of conception can correlate powerfully with predictions of CP. Providing good nutrition to the societally marginalized and developing nations is vital to keep the rates of cerebral palsy far lower than it has been historically. Between nutrition, vaccination and attention to blood type complications, cerebral palsy in some parts of the world can be dramatically reduced.


Miller, Freeman & Bachrach, Steven J. (1995) Cerebral Palsy: A Complete Guide for Caregiving. The John Hopkins University Press

Stanley, Fiona, Blair, Eve, Alberman, Eva. (2000) Cerebral Palsies: Epidemiology & Causal Pathways. Mac Keith Press

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Causes of Cerebral Palsy: Origins, Etiology, Aetiology, Causal Pathways